[feed] pefprints@pef.uni-lj.si | [feed] Atom [feed] RSS 1.0 [feed] RSS 2.0 |
slovenščina
Logo            
  Logo Login | Create Account
 
 

Some neuromyths and facts about the brain - What is important to know for learning and teaching?

Simona Tancig (2017) Some neuromyths and facts about the brain - What is important to know for learning and teaching?. In: Sodobni pristopi poučevanja prihajajočih generacij, Mednarodna konferenca EDUvision, 30 Nov - 2 Dec 2017, Ljubljana.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (792Kb)

    Abstract

    Neuroscience literacy – general knowledge about the brain and neuromyths – has gained strong interest among educators worldwide. Sometimes educators are accepting teaching practices that do not have scientific basis in neuroscience. This phenomenon has been labeled 'spread of misconception' (neuromyths) about the brain structure and its functions. Sometimes neuromyths originate from research that has been misinterpreted or extrapolated well beyond the data involved. There is a growing body of literature on adoption of neuromyths among teachers. Neuroscience literacy among teachers has been documented in a number of countries with very different cultures. The main aim of this paper is to examine several of the most popular neuromyths, which are also prevalent among prospective teachers (students) of the Faculty of Education at the University of Ljubljana. These neuromyths are: we use 10 % our brain; different children have different learning styles – AVK; left brain thinkers differ from right brain ones. On the other hand, in order to raise the awareness of importance of neuroscience literacy we also review scientific evidence for the brain facts: the brain is plastic; education is a powerful form of cognitive enhancement; mindfulness and its place in the classroom – nowadays a very active area of research. In order to reduce the number of misconception we suggest enhancing the neuroscience literacy of teachers by incorporating neuroeducational courses into teachers' education as recommended by The Royal Society (2011).

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
    Keywords: brain facts, neuroeducation, neuromyths, neuroscience literacy
    Related URLs:
    URLURL Type
    http://www.eduvision.si/Content/Docs/Zbornik%20prispevkov%20EDUvision_2017.pdfAlternative location
    https://plus.si.cobiss.net/opac7/bib/peflj/11939401Alternative location
    Institution: University of Ljubljana
    Department: Faculty of Education
    Item ID: 5004
    Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2018 09:14
    Last Modified: 09 Mar 2018 09:14
    URI: http://pefprints.pef.uni-lj.si/id/eprint/5004

    Actions (login required)

    View Item